MIMS selection process – official report

MIMS selection process – official report

This is interesting. Ned Denison, member of the MIMS selection committee, posted the following “inside scoop” on the selection of the field for the 2011 swim. From the Channel Swimmers chat group:

Last year I reported from “inside” the committee to help you all understand how the selection process worked for the 2010 solo swim. Time to update you – a year later.  The goal is simply to de-mystify the process for future solo applicants.

The application process for Manhattan is not simple !   It takes a few hours to complete a swimmer profile and upload evidence of swims and write an essay.  The earlier one starts the more time you have to ask questions and get help. So…the final date was announced in advance and the applicants scheduled time to get up early or stay up late or take an hour or so off work (depending on their location in the world!)

  1. The first 15 applications received were very qualified, had no information outstanding, met all the diversity requirements and were automatically selected.
  2. Another four were automatically accepted out of the next 14 completed applications to help fully meet the diversity criteria. 


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MIMS field selection update

MIMS field selection update

By my unofficial observations, the online applications for MIMS were closed a little over an hour after they opened. 46 swimmers threw their hats into the ring during that time, including:

  • 14 women and 32 men
  • 6 Australians, 4 Britons, 2 Irish, 4 Mexicans, 1 Italian, 1 Portuguese, 2 Spaniards, and 26 Americans
  • 20 English Channel crossers, 6 Catalina Channel crossers, and 8 MIMS finishers

The early favorites would have to include:

  • John Van Wisse – MIMS winner in 2000, 2008, and 2009, and 2-way English Channel crosser in 2010.
  • Erica Rose – former USA open-water national team member, 5K world champion, and more recently, 6th overall finisher in this year’s Big Shoulders 5K.

19 applications (including my own) were accepted the same afternoon, on the basis of the “first-come, first-served, first-completed” policy (i.e., no missing medical forms, etc.). That leaves 6 spots for the remaining 27 applicants. The selection committee will likely meet over the next couple of days, at which point the final field of 25 solo swimmers will be announced.…

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Worldwide tribute to Fran Crippen

Worldwide tribute to Fran Crippen

On October 30, swimmers and friends-of-swimming around the world visited lakes, oceans, bays, rivers, and man-made pools, and offered a tribute to a great swimmer and (by all accounts) remarkable human being, who passed too soon.

Images from all corners of the globe are collected in these two Facebook albums. The second one is viewable by non-Facebook members, but the first one is somewhat better.

Both are beautiful beyond words.…

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In the News – Week of October 25

In the News – Week of October 25

The latest from Steven Munatones’ inimitable Daily News:
11/1/2010

11/1/2010

The MIMS application went online at 1pm Eastern today, as scheduled. I was no later than the 8th solo swimmer to submit a complete application, so I should be in good shape to make the 25-person field. By 2pm Eastern, 40 solo swimmers had applied.

I now await word from the committee who reviews the applications. It could be a few days. Did I dot all my I’s and cross all my T’s? Let’s hope so.…

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Post-race blues and Where do we go from here?

Post-race blues and Where do we go from here?

Racing is fun, but it can exact a toll – physically but also psychologically.

The combination of long distance and high intensity in open water races can deplete one’s glycogen stores dramatically, and the result can be temporary lethargy in the water. In my experience this summer, while I wasn’t noticeably affected by races up to 5K, the four 10K’s I did (not including the current-assisted Little Red Lighthouse “10K”) all messed me up for a while. It was typically about a week before I felt back at full strength in practice.

While the body needs time to recover from a long, intense race, I also found that the mind may need time, too. It’s not often discussed, but for me the “post-race blues” are very real. The longer the race, the longer it takes. The more important the race, the longer it takes. The symptoms: Basically, a lack of desire to swim. And if I do drag myself to the pool – a lack of joy in swimming, and a lack of motivation to work hard.…

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OWS: no idle pastime

OWS: no idle pastime

UPDATE: Daily News of OWS remembers Fran Crippen: [1], [2], [3]

In the span of only about 24 hours, the open water swimming community has been reminded twice – in the most tragic way possible - that our sport may have more in common with mountain climbing than it does with pool swimming.

Open water swimming can take many forms, but at it’s heart it’s an extreme sport – with extreme dangers. These dangers are both external – as in Lucas Ransom’s fatal encounter with a great white shark off the Central California coast – and internal – as in Fran Crippen’s sudden death from (apparently) heat exhaustion during a FINA 10K race.

When we immerse ourselves in the open water we put our lives in the hands of powerful, conscience-less forces, from currents and waves to sharks and toxic microorganisms. When we push ourselves to physical extremes – in distance, effort, or both – there’s no guarantee our bodies will be up to the task.

We love the open water for the freedom, the challenge, the adventure.…

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2010 Open-Water Season in Review

2010 Open-Water Season in Review

Despite my best efforts, the 2010 open-water season is now over! Like Rob, my original plan was relatively modest compared to the end result (though it seemed ambitious at the time). At first, I aimed to run the gauntlet of USMS open-water national championship series – North Carolina, California, Colorado, Virginia, and Indiana – and finish off the season at Big Shoulders in Chicago.

As the year wore on, I found excuses – one by one – to add more events. For the Nike Swim Miami, it was an excuse to visit an old college roommate. For the Cascade Lakes Festival, I got to meet up with my parents and visit my grandmother. For Madison, the drive from Chicago was too short to pass up. Ditto for Diamond Lake. For Little Red Lighthouse, it was a chance to try an NYC Swim race before applying to MIMS. For Swim the Suck, it was a chance to try a true marathon swim and extend my season into October.

And now here we are, 17 races (in 12 states) and 57.4 racing miles (92.4K) later.…

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