Quick Hits 3.15.11

Quick Hits 3.15.11


– I love that in Australian Masters Swimming, the 1500m backstroke is an actual event, with actual national records. And the 400 breaststroke. And the 800 IM. All strokes, all distances. And I love that the records for the their equivalent of the “postal” swims (3K, 6K, 10K, 30/45/60 minute swims) are part of the same database as the “regular” meet swims. Why don’t we do this in America??

Boy, I would’ve had a killer 1500m backstroke back in the day. There’s a funny story about that, actually. I was about 16, and my club team had a mid-season long-course meet in which I was supposed to swim the 800 free. We were right in the middle of hard training and I was swimming terribly at this meet. But there was no getting out of the 800 free. So, instead of swimming a slow time and depressing myself further, I decided to try something a little different. I dove off the block for the 800 and… turned over on my back. I had never done an 800 backstroke before, so I had no idea what a good time would be. I ended up going 10:05. Not bad, right? I think I even beat some of the kids in my heat.

– In other news… friend-of-the-blog Dave Barra and his fellow New Yorker Rondi Davies have an interesting swim planned for July. 120 miles down the Hudson River over 7 days; from Catskill, NY to the Verrazano Narrows bridge south of Manhattan. It’s the 8 Bridges Swim, and it will be epic.

– US Masters Swimming’s Swimmer Magazine devoted its latest issue to Open Water, which is sort of exciting. The lead article (by Alex Kostich) is available as a PDF download, for those of you who aren’t USMS members.

2 Responses to “Quick Hits 3.15.11”

  1. Sully

    2011-03-15T20:24:23+00:00

    Does anyone know Aussie history well enough to know why swimming is so revered in Australia?

    Reply
    • Evan

      2011-03-16T19:27:07+00:00

      I’m not too familiar with its history w/r/t swimming, but I’m guessing it may have something to do with geography? It’s basically a big island and almost all its major metropolitan areas are on the coast. Nice climate, too. Ergo, a culture that places importance on swimming.

      Reply

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