Swim Report: Kirby Cove to Aquatic Park

Swim Report: Kirby Cove to Aquatic Park

Two days before Bay to Breakers in May (yes, it’s a belated report), an oversubscribed volunteer corps opened up a couple spots on another SERC club swim: Kirby Cove to Aquatic Park. Kirby Cove is the same beach on the Marin Headlands where Cathy finished her “Three Bridges” swim in March. Outside the Golden Gate, but not as far as Point Diablo or Point Bonita. At 4.2 miles (current-assisted), it’s one of the longer SERC club swims, so a bit odd to have on the same weekend as Bay to Breakers.

I wasn’t planning to swim that morning and showed up to help kayak or time. It turned out there were plenty of volunteers, so I figured what the hell… I paid my fee and changed, like a chubby Clark Kent, into my drag suit and parka. Game on.

I noticed “D,” one of the faster SERC swimmers, was also entered, but I hoped to not get “baited” into racing him. Better to take it easy and gear up for the more important swim two days later: Bay to Breakers (in which, incidentally, “D” was also entered).…

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Improving the Swedish goggle? Testing the Nootca 5

Improving the Swedish goggle? Testing the Nootca 5

Along with Strokemaker paddles, the original Malmsten Swedish goggle is a design that has withstood the test of time. While I’m generally eager to embrace new technologies, I’ve worn the same model of swim goggles for over 20 years now.

Swedes are stereotyped as a pool swimming goggle, but I’ve seen no compelling reason to embrace gaskets in the open water. Why mess with a good thing? Take note of my goggle choice in my four longest swims (clockwise from top-left, the Tampa Bay Marathon Swim, Santa Barbara Channel, Catalina Channel, and Manhattan Island Marathon Swim):

At the same time, I’ll concede some occasional frustration with the cheap materials in classic Swedes – the scratch-proneness of the lenses, and the ultra-short lifespan of the latex straps. So, my interest was piqued when Steven Keegan – founder of Nootca and formerly a product designer with Speedo and Nike Swim – answered my “Super Swede” challenge and offered to let me try his Swede-“inspired” Nootca 5 goggle.…

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Marathon Swimming Nutrition – Index of Articles

Marathon Swimming Nutrition – Index of Articles

I’ve written a variety of posts over the last few years on nutritional considerations in marathon swimming. Here they are in one place for your reference.


Series: The Art & Science of Marathon Swimming Nutrition

On Recovery Drinks – includes a DIY powdered recovery drink recipe

On Maltodextrin – Maxim vs. Carbo Pro

Series: On Nutritional Science in Marathon Swimming

On Peter Attia’s nutrition webinar

Marathon swimming and low-carbohydrate diets

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My New, New Beach

My New, New Beach

[Read "My New Beach" from last year]

Not explicitly mentioned here yet, but implied between the lines, is that I’ve moved again. This time, to San Francisco.

My new beach, a six minute walk door to sand, isn’t quite as “secret” as the last one.

ocean beach
Ocean Beach, San Francisco. Panoramic photo courtesy of Wikimedia commons – click to enlarge.

The “Outside Lands” of San Francisco, with Ocean Beach along its western flank, are reputed to be foggy and windswept. In my two months here – typically the foggiest of the year – I’ve found that reputation to be vastly overstated.

The Pacific Ocean from my window. Farallon Islands at center.
The Pacific Ocean from my window. Farallon Islands at center.

And so another new adventure commences…

ocean beach
Looking north from my nearest dune.
ocean beach
Looking south from my nearest dune.

The Ocean is your Mother – let her love and caress you.

— Randy Brown…

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The second time, at swim camp…

The second time, at swim camp…

It’s no hyperbole, just a simple statement of fact, that Jamie Patrick‘s Swim Camp last year changed the course of my life. I returned this year for the “Lake Tahoe Edition” for several reasons, most important of which was to honor the 2012 edition, and the man who organized it, for introducing me to a beautiful new friend.

My very first pair of FINIS Agility paddles

;-)

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Photo by Lynn K.

This year’s swim camp was a hoot, albeit a different sort of hoot. Which was, naturally, a function of both different people and a different environment. Like last year, “swim camp” was a bit of a misnomer. “Camp for people who swim” would be more accurate.

Among this year’s highlights was a swim in Emerald Bay and around its island (the only one in Tahoe, known as Fannette). It couldn’t have been more perfect, save perhaps an earlier jump time to avoid boat traffic. Good lord, what beautiful water, as if from a dream.

emerald bay
Emerald Bay, Lake Tahoe, from the access trail. Unfortunately the boat-hiring tourists like it too.


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Sharks Live in the Ocean, Part 2

Sharks Live in the Ocean, Part 2

[Read Part 1]

When we swim in the ocean we share the water with an abundance of other life, some of it larger and toothier than we are. Just because we don’t see them doesn’t mean they’re not there. And just because they’re there doesn’t mean they care about us, or want anything to do with us.

Members of the South End Rowing Club and Dolphin Club, who share a beach on Aquatic Park, San Francisco, were recently reminded of these truths when a three-foot juvenile salmon shark swam into the cove and spent a few minutes cruising around near our docks. Salmon sharks sport a distinctive white underbelly and are sometimes mistaken for juvenile Great Whites. Though adults can grow to 10 feet long, they’re generally not considered a threat to humans.

Some footage taken by South Ender Gary Emich:

[Link to YouTube video]

The shark is behaving oddly and appears disoriented. According to the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation in Santa Cruz, this shark may be suffering from a carnobacterium infection and resulting blindness. The PSRF has received several other reports recently of sharks beaching themselves elsewhere in Northern California.…

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