Dead Fish Swims

Dead Fish Swims

A “dead fish swim” is a swim that even a dead fish could finish. (Maybe not literally… but sometimes almost literally.)

This is a bit of local (SF) open-water swimming lingo that I wish would be more widely used (hence this post).

dead-fish

Dead fish swims require bodies of water affected by substantial currents — as fast or faster than “fast” swimmers swim. Let’s set the minimum current threshold for a dead fish swim (arbitrarily) at 2 knots.

Most of the organized swims put on by the Dolphin and South End Rowing Clubs in San Francisco Bay are dead fish swims. Coghlan Beach to Aquatic Park on a flood (the traditional route for the fall Inter-Club Triathlon) is a dead fish swim. Pier 7 to Aquatic Park (the most popular SERC “sunriser” route) on a big ebb is a dead fish swim.

Even the challenging Bay to Breakers swim is sort of a dead fish swim — until the last mile or so, when the current goes slack and you have to get around Seal Rocks and into the beach via actual swimming (and bodysurfing).…

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Giulietta Carrelli: Artisanal Food-Craze Originator, and Open Water Swimmer

Giulietta Carrelli: Artisanal Food-Craze Originator, and Open Water Swimmer

One morning on my first visit to San Francisco to see Cathy, we got coffee in the neighborhood, at Trouble Coffee & Coconut Club. It’s an eccentric little place, with studiously quirky interior details and a parklet outside, handcrafted from local driftwood.

My preferred parklet seat, outside Trouble.

The coffee was excellent: a smooth, full-bodied medium-dark roast. Rounding out the eclectic yet focused menu were toast (hefty buttered slabs, sprinkled liberally with cinnamon), coconuts, and… grapefruit juice.

But the reason Cathy took me to this specific craft coffee shop in a city full of them, was to meet her friend Giulietta – the owner of Trouble, and an open water swimmer. Cathy knows Giulietta through China Beach, the main alternative to Aquatic Park for OWS in San Francisco.

It’s been nearly two years since my first taste of Trouble. In the interim, Giulietta has become something of a local celebrity, as “artisanal toast” has begun popping up on hipster-food menus throughout the city. Trouble is widely credited as the originator of this trend.

But this story goes far deeper than mere toast, and that’s why Giulietta recently became the first open water swimmer (as far as I know) to be featured on This American Life.…

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At the South End…

At the South End…

At the South End we are swimmers, rowers, runners, and handballers.

But even many of the rowers, runners, and handballers are swimmers too — because to us, there is no better place for it.

At the South End we swim with, against, and across the currents.

At the South End we swim outside the Cove… outside comfort zones.

At the South End we do Bay to Breakers the hard way.

At the South End we swig from growlers in the sauna.

They call us the “feral neighbors,” but all the best Open Water Swimmers are a bit feral at heart.

At the South End we ponder the swims that Can be done, rather than the ones that Can’t.

At the South End we know the quietest part of the city.

At the South End we are never alone.

“Leaving the City Behind.” Photo by Cy Lo, reprinted with permission.


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The Chas Lap

The Chas Lap

The “Chas Lap” is the longest, burliest standard training swim one can do in the Aquatic Park vicinity.

(By standard, I mean: It is readily understood by a two- or three-word phrase in the men’s and women’s saunas at the South End Rowing Club.)

The Chas Lap touches, by definition, the western and eastern boundaries of the area in which it is acceptable for South End members to swim unescorted. There are bigger, burlier swims possible elsewhere in the Bay, but – and here’s the key – if you swim across the path of potential boat traffic, you must have an escort vessel. A Chas Lap can be done unescorted, and therefore requires far less planning.

Important Safety Caveats:

  • Never swim outside the Cove alone! You could get injured or killed, and no one would know, possibly for hours.
  • Avoid swimming outside the Cove later than mid-morning. Theoretically you should be safe from boat traffic by hugging the pier or breakwater, but there are always many more boats in the afternoon. The more boats in the area, the more potential for some rogue idiot boat driver to ruin your day.


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Sub-100 Swims

Sub-100 Swims

Sub-100 swims: Also known as “winter” for San Francisco open-water swimmers.

A sub-100 swim is when the water and air temperatures (in degrees F) sum to less than 100. For example, 50 degree water + 50 degree air = 100 exactly.

For our metric system friends, a sub-100 day conveniently converts to a sub-20C day, precisely.

Like much of the western U.S., San Francisco has been experiencing a bit of a cold snap lately. This morning at Aquatic Park we had 51-degree (10.5C) water combined with 37-degree (2.8C) air, for a combined total of 87 – which, I think, is a new all-time low for me.

wundermap

I swam with my 6:30am group for our typical 45 minutes. Tellingly, the South End men’s showers were already running lukewarm when I arrived.

The concept of a “sub-100 swim” derives (as far as I know) from fellow South Ender Gary Emich. On his way to 1,000+ Alcatraz crossings, Gary noticed that 100 degrees combined air+water was a threshold below which his morning swims with the ASSes (which often include a dripping-wet post-swim RIB ride) became rather… challenging.…

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Swimming Hole: South Yuba River, California

Swimming Hole: South Yuba River, California

A swimming hole in the South Yuba River, near the Old Highway 49 Bridge, a few miles outside Nevada City, Nevada County, California.

Swimming hole near Old Highway 49 Bridge, Nevada County, California

Geographical location of swimming hole:

Location of swimming hole

Swimming through a hidden tunnel:

[Link to YouTube video]

Swimming upriver:

[Link to YouTube video]

Resting on the rocks:

On the rocks

Denver Post article: Down to the old swimming hole: Dog days of California’s South Yuba River

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Non-Swim Report: Tomales Bay White Shark Swimming Association Fall “Chomp”

Non-Swim Report: Tomales Bay White Shark Swimming Association Fall “Chomp”

2013-10-05 16_07_39-www.parks.ca.gov_pages_470_files_TomalesBaySPWebLayout2013.pdfEach fall and spring, the channel swimmer / bubble-cap aficionado / legendary South Ender known as El Sharko (occasionally “Sir Sharko,” sometimes shortened to “Sharko,” and just “Chris” to his wife) organizes a swim & BBQ at Heart’s Desire Beach in Tomales Bay State Park, north of San Francisco.

In homage to the white sharks who breed near the mouth of Tomales Bay, this event is known as the “Tomales Bay White Shark Swimming Association (TBWSSA) Chomp” (alternatively, “Tomales Bay Dangerous ‘Swim with the White Sharks’ Chomp,” often shortened to simply “The Chomp”). Sharko’s sanguine approach to the oft-repressed fact of VW-sized predators in our local waters is encapsulated by his calling card: “I never met a shark I didn’t like.”

Photo by Jeff Brown
Special “Chomp” course buoy, handmade by El Sharko. Photo by Jeff Brown

The “Fall Chomp” of 2013 fell on what must surely go down as one of the most glorious days of the year: 80 degrees, windless clear skies all the way to the Farallons. Heart’s Desire Beach, about two-thirds of the way inland (8.5 miles) from the Bay mouth, lived up to its name.…

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