Wet Drylands

Wet Drylands

You don’t need a gym to get a great dryland workout. I’d venture to say that you don’t need more than a medicine ball and a pair of stretch cords.

In some cases, you don’t even need dry land! One of the most effective core exercises I’ve ever done involves taking the medicine ball with you into the pool (preferably not one of those old school leather med balls, though). Push off the wall on your back while holding the ball above your upper chest with both hands, and dolphin kick to the other end of the pool. Try to feel how your core initiates and powers the dolphin kicking motion, all the way through to your feet.

I typically do a set of 50’s, alternating 50 med-ball dolphining / 50 fast fly or back, working the SDK’s. I use a 4-6 pound medicine ball, but you can make it easier or harder by using a lighter/heavier ball or by holding the ball closer/further from your chest.…

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Don’t underestimate Tampa

Don’t underestimate Tampa

Some people do the Tampa Bay Marathon Swim as a “warm-up” for one of the triple crown swims. And it makes sense: Tampa is early in the season, 8 weeks before MIMS and more than 3 months before high season for channel crossings.

But thinking of Tampa as a “warm-up” might tempt a person to take it less seriously – and that would be a big mistake. TBMS is one of only four annual organized ultra-marathon (25K or longer) swim races in the U.S. (along with MIMS, Ederle, and Swim Across the Sound), and it may be the toughest. While water temperature is not usually a factor, pretty much everything else is. Glancing through the archives, tide changes and rough seas seem to be the two big ones.

Swimmers typically start with the flood tide, which pushes them up Tampa Bay — for a while. If you don’t swim far enough over the next few hours, though, the tide reverses direction and starts to push you back towards St. Petersburg – making it effectively impossible to finish.

Tampa Bay is also quite large, so conditions can mimic those in the open ocean. …

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Quick Hits 3.15.11

Quick Hits 3.15.11

– I love that in Australian Masters Swimming, the 1500m backstroke is an actual event, with actual national records. And the 400 breaststroke. And the 800 IM. All strokes, all distances. And I love that the records for the their equivalent of the “postal” swims (3K, 6K, 10K, 30/45/60 minute swims) are part of the same database as the “regular” meet swims. Why don’t we do this in America??

Boy, I would’ve had a killer 1500m backstroke back in the day. There’s a funny story about that, actually. I was about 16, and my club team had a mid-season long-course meet in which I was supposed to swim the 800 free. We were right in the middle of hard training and I was swimming terribly at this meet. But there was no getting out of the 800 free. So, instead of swimming a slow time and depressing myself further, I decided to try something a little different. I dove off the block for the 800 and… turned over on my back. I had never done an 800 backstroke before, so I had no idea what a good time would be.…

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Adventures in video analysis

Adventures in video analysis

A coach recently alerted me to a couple non-canonical things I’m doing with my freestyle technique. Of course, I had no clue I was doing these things. It occurred to me that it’s been years since I’d seen my stroke on video (my brief appearance in the Swim the Suck documentary excepted). Actually, probably about 15 years – at least as far back as high school. What else am I doing that I’m unaware of?

Having multiple underwater cameras positioned at different angles is ideal, but can be expensive to set up. On the theory that something is better than nothing, I bought a small tripod to mount and secure my trusty Canon PowerShot, which shoots HD video. Then, it was just a matter of propping it up at the end of my lane and pressing the shutter button.

I was mostly interested in looking at my freestyle (unlike some, I have no plans to swim around Manhattan doing butterfly). As long as I had the camera set up, though, I figured I’d check out my other strokes. Accordingly, I did a set of {100 free, 200 IM, 100 free, 200 IM, 100 free}.…

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Quick Hits 3.9.11

Quick Hits 3.9.11

- The Nike Swim Miami will have a new venue and a live web broadcast! (Daily News of O.W.S.)

– Friend-of-the-blog Adam B. qualified for the big dance of American open-water swimming with a 10:05 1000 Free at Virginia Senior Champs. Congrats!

– The Princeton men’s swim team recently passed 100K views on YouTube for their lip-syncing tribute to a teammate stricken with MRSA. This almost makes me nostalgic for my time at DeNunzio. Almost. I will say this, though: C. Rob Orr is a genius and a great man. Additional coverage from the Daily Princetonian.

UPDATE: Princeton captain Colin Hanna and Daniel Hasler (the sick teammate) appeared on today’s Swimming World Morning Swim Show. Great story.…

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New site feature: open-water pace table

New site feature: open-water pace table

When you book a channel crossing, most experienced pilots will want to know how fast of a swimmer you are. Can you repeat 20-minute miles, 25-minute miles, or 30-minute miles? A pilot will often want to start a faster swimmer at a different time of day (and in some cases, a different location) than a slower swimmer.

But what if you train mostly in a pool? Do you give the pilot your best 1,650 time?

The problem with trying to estimate speed in the open water from pool times is…well, lots of things. But one of the big ones is turns. If you gain 1 second every time you push of the wall in the pool, that’s 2 seconds per 100 long-course and 4 seconds per 100 short-course, compared to the equivalent distance in open water.

So, if you use a straight conversion of distance-to-distance, you’ll probably over-estimate your open water speed (unless you have really slow turns). Here, then, is an open water pace table that factors in time gained from turns. It assumes 1 second gained per wall – some people gain more and some people gain less, but I think it’s a reasonable approximation.…

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Pre-Tampa training swim

Pre-Tampa training swim

Last weekend I did a rather epic pool workout (as you know if you follow my Twitter feed). An unexpected excuse came up for a quick trip to Santa Barbara, and given my current lack of long course or open water options in Chicago, I decided to use the opportunity for a pre-Tampa training swim. The Rec Center at UCSB has a beautiful outdoor 50m x 25y pool that – conveniently – is open for LCM lap swimming from 9am to 8:30pm on the weekends.

Despite a chilly morning, it turned into a gorgeous day. With cloudless skies, a light breeze, and mid-day highs in the 60s, I actually worried about getting sunburned. When the front door opened at 9am I went straight to the pool to claim my lane – second from the bottom of the picture, with the best viewing angle to the pace clock. Incredibly, nobody joined me in that lane until the last 15 minutes of the swim.

In designing the workout, I aimed for something that would challenge me in terms of distance, time, and pace, but without boring me to death.…

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