The music of DRIVEN

The music of DRIVEN


[YouTube video]

[Narrator] Day breaks.

And almost miraculously, despite five hours of complete darkness and grueling conditions, Evan’s swim is still just on track to break the speed record.

But even though time is on his side, Evan’s will to push on teeters on the brink.

[Evan] I wasn’t motivated. There was no goal I had in mind — at least at night.

Really, there was just nothing else but: One stroke after another.

And then during the day, everything shifted a little bit.

There’s an unavoidable thing, with the sun coming up into the sky, and night turning into day. Life seems a little bit better.

I guess I thought to myself: Well, I made it to this point. I can’t really quit now. That would be ridiculous.

[Narrator] Evan doesn’t push on; he charges on.

[David Yudovin] If you’re motivated to make the swim, it’s going to work. If it’s deep in your heart, it will all fall into place.

[DRIVEN official website]…

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Launching the global Rules of Marathon Swimming

Launching the global Rules of Marathon Swimming

We’ve come a long way in four years.

“Evan’s Swim Blog” became “Freshwater Swimmer,” which finally became “Farther, Colder, Rougher.”

A mile became two; 5K became 10K; 10 miles became 24, round-Manhattan, Catalina, and an Ederle record. The SBCSA led to a Santa Cruz Island swim, which turned into DRIVEN. That one time at swim camp led, in a roundabout sorta way, to San Francisco and the South End.

A transcontinental online friendship with Donal Buckley, the Loneswimmer, produced the Marathon Swimmers Forum. The Forum made international news, and my girlfriend’s parents met me for the first time on NBC Nightly News.

And the soul-searching discussions that followed – the realization that no one was better positioned to move our sport forward than we are – ultimately produced this:

With Andrew Malinak, Donal Buckley, Elaine Howley, and the Marathon Swimmers Federation we represent, I’m proud to announce:

The MSF Rules of Marathon Swimming

If you like them, please add your endorsement here or on the Forum.…

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I hate winter swimming; I love winter swimming.

I hate winter swimming; I love winter swimming.

In life it’s often necessary to convince oneself to do something one doesn’t want to do, in order to realize future rewards (physical, financial, emotional).

I experience this life truth in microcosm, every morning I swim in San Francisco Bay in the winter. I hate getting up early (I’m a night-owl — always have been). I hate it even more when it’s dark outside; even more when it’s cold outside. And most of all, when the reason for doing so is swimming, nearly naked, in 49-degree water.

Yet it must be done. Because no one ever says, “I really regret swimming today.” Even when the water’s 49 degrees. Perhaps especially when it’s 49 degrees.

Immersion is painful. There’s no avoiding it, even with repetition. Yet nothing makes me feel more aliveAnd there’s a reason for that: Pain is my body’s evolved, automatic response to encountering an environment that cannot sustain human life. “GTFO,” my body says at first.

When I refuse, the pain fades after a few minutes, and in its place arises a powerful warmth, which keeps the forces of death at bay (for a while).…

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Sub-100 Swims

Sub-100 Swims

Sub-100 swims: Also known as “winter” for San Francisco open-water swimmers.

A sub-100 swim is when the water and air temperatures (in degrees F) sum to less than 100. For example, 50 degree water + 50 degree air = 100 exactly.

For our metric system friends, a sub-100 day conveniently converts to a sub-20C day, precisely.

Like much of the western U.S., San Francisco has been experiencing a bit of a cold snap lately. This morning at Aquatic Park we had 51-degree (10.5C) water combined with 37-degree (2.8C) air, for a combined total of 87 – which, I think, is a new all-time low for me.

wundermap

I swam with my 6:30am group for our typical 45 minutes. Tellingly, the South End men’s showers were already running lukewarm when I arrived.

The concept of a “sub-100 swim” derives (as far as I know) from fellow South Ender Gary Emich. On his way to 1,000+ Alcatraz crossings, Gary noticed that 100 degrees combined air+water was a threshold below which his morning swims with the ASSes (which often include a dripping-wet post-swim RIB ride) became rather… challenging.…

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Suit, cap, goggles: That’s all you really need.

Suit, cap, goggles: That’s all you really need.

My swim cap is tighter-fitting; my goggles are lighter-weight; and my swimsuit is constructed of chlorine-resistant polyester.

But aside from that, not much has changed from fifty years ago, when South End Rowing Club members waded into Aquatic Park cove wearing this:

Swim costume, circa 1960s. South End Rowing Club, San Francisco.
Swim costume, circa 1960s. South End Rowing Club, San Francisco.

I’d argue that the only truly essential item is the goggles… but this is a family-friendly site.

Close-up of goggles from the same display.
Close-up of goggles from the same display.

Marathon swimming resists technology more than most sports, thanks to strict guidelines on swimwear enforced in the English Channel (our Everest) – guidelines which are widely emulated around the world. Indeed it’s a point of pride among many marathon swimmers, who value the connection with our sport’s pioneers. A level playing field across decades.

I’d even call it an aestheticSuit, cap, goggles. That’s all we really need. Man, woman, and the sea. There is equipment that would make it easier, but we actively reject it. Our sport is tough, and we like it that way. 

inscription
Close-up of inscription on above display case.


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SBCSA and CCSF Annual Banquets, 2013

SBCSA and CCSF Annual Banquets, 2013

This past weekend I attended the annual banquets of the Catalina Channel Swimming Federation (CCSF) and Santa Barbara Channel Swimming Association (SBCSA). For the past few years the two events have been scheduled for the same day, in the same city (San Pedro), with CCSF providing brunch at the Doubletree and the SBCSA providing dinner at a restaurant downtown. This arrangement seems to maximize cross-pollination between the two events – reminding everyone of the patch of ocean we share, and giving us just a little more time together.

This is my third year attending “Banquet Day” in San Pedro.

In 2011, I was a swimmer-honoree at the CCSF event, having just crossed the Catalina Channel (8:55 on August 25, and I didn’t even have to look it up). Later that day, I attended my first board meeting with the SBCSA. Rob D. and I then moved on to the Crowne Plaza bar and talked of big dreams into the wee hours.

In 2012, I returned to celebrate the new class of CCSF swimmers including my dear friend Gracie, the new record holder.…

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Swimming Hole: South Yuba River, California

Swimming Hole: South Yuba River, California

A swimming hole in the South Yuba River, near the Old Highway 49 Bridge, a few miles outside Nevada City, Nevada County, California.

Swimming hole near Old Highway 49 Bridge, Nevada County, California

Geographical location of swimming hole:

Location of swimming hole

Swimming through a hidden tunnel:

[Link to YouTube video]

Swimming upriver:

[Link to YouTube video]

Resting on the rocks:

On the rocks

Denver Post article: Down to the old swimming hole: Dog days of California’s South Yuba River

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