New MSF Documented Swim: David Dammerman - Lake George, New York

evmoevmo San FranciscoAdmin

Pleased to announce a new MSF Documented Swim: on June 18-19, David Dammerman of Saratoga Springs, NY completed a 32.2-mile lengthwise swim of Lake George, New York. His time of 18hr49 was a new speed record.

David's swim documentation was produced by observer Deborah Roberts, and Bob Singer of the Lake George Marathon Swim. See here:

http://marathonswimmers.org/swims/2016/dammerman-lake-george

Well swum, David!

rlmIronMiketortugapavlicovthelittlemerwookieJenAViveBenesuziedodsdavid_barraloneswimmerbluemermaid9

Comments

  • JaimieJaimie NYCCharter Member

    Woohoo congrats David! So fast!

    Bridget
  • hmeermanhmeerman Encinitas, CAMember

    Well done David! Having been born and raised in the vicinity, this swim is on my bucket list. Hope that I can tap into the group who facilitated your swim to organize a date in the future.

  • suziedodssuziedods Charter Member

    I just love reading the commentary, I still dont understand the dots on the graph ( I do understand the dots on the MAP). but really fab achievement.

    Looking for the next big thing.. ... @suzieswimcoach www.suziedodsswimcoaching.com

  • evmoevmo San FranciscoAdmin
    edited July 2016

    @suziedods said: I still dont understand the dots on the graph

    Thanks for asking about this, in case others have the same question. Inserting the graph for reference:

    The graph shows David's speed (Y-axis) across time (X-axis). Each dot represents a trackpoint - in this case, 10-minute intervals.

    David shows a common speed pattern for long marathon swims: Starts off fresh, gradually declines in speed (especially at night), then recovers slightly near the end of the swim (but not to the level of the start).

    The shaded line is a "smoothing" function that attempts to separate the general trend from the noisy raw data.

    Does that clarify?

    tortugabluemermaid9
  • suziedodssuziedods Charter Member

    Yes.. thank you. Now.. about June 19 ( apparently about midnight?) there are two very disparate dots..one.. just around the 1.2Kph and one just about 3.2kph... how is that possible?Within about 10 min of each other? Am I reading that right?

    Looking for the next big thing.. ... @suzieswimcoach www.suziedodsswimcoaching.com

  • evmoevmo San FranciscoAdmin
    edited July 2016

    @suziedods said: about June 19 ( apparently about midnight?) there are two very disparate dots..one.. just around the 1.2Kph and one just about 3.2kph... how is that possible?

    GPS devices aren't perfectly accurate, especially consumer-grade ones (in this case, it was a SPOT). When you see one trackpoint that is an outlier on the low side, and the very next trackpoint is an outlier on the high side, it's almost always due to a slightly inaccurate reading on the GPS device.

    In other words, it is meaningless "noise." The reality is somewhere near the average of the two dots. That's why I include the "smoothing" line -- watch the line, not the individual dots.

    ssthomassuziedods
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