Cook Strait Swim rules

evmoevmo Admin
edited September 2013 in General Discussion
This discussion was created from comments split from: 110 miles, 53 hours: Questions for Diana Nyad.
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  • edited September 2013
    David, et al?
    The Cook swim, if swimmer boarded the boat for safety, would be classified as an "assisted" swim - or not a "non-assisted" swim since the assistance was beyond the scope of delivering food, water, and navigation?  How would this type of swim (Cook swim) be classified and presented for the record?
  • The Cook swim, if swimmer boarded the boat for safety, would be classified as an "assisted" swim - or not a "non-assisted" swim since the assistance was beyond the scope of delivering food, water, and navigation?  How would this type of swim (Cook swim) be classified and presented for the record?

    How Cook swims are classified for Cook swim records is the decision of the Cook swim sanctioning body, i.e., Phil Rush.

    If a Cook swimmer set a speed record that included a shark break, I suppose Phil has the prerogative to recognize it, but I hope he wouldn't.

    If a Cook swimmer did a 4-way crossing and claimed a world distance or time-in-water record, but the swim included a shark break, then I'd say no way, no how, should that swim be considered for an unassisted world record (non-geographically specific).
  • Niek said:

    And that maybe because if they did declare, a swimmer on record pace may refuse to get out not to interrupt swim or be flagged with "onboard assist".
    That swimmer is declared disqualified. The pilot and the observer will immediate stop the race.
    They decide the safety not the swimmer or coach.
    Ahh so are you saying in Cook Straight swim if the swimmer is required to exit water and board the support vessel due to shark presence or sighting, the swim is over and swimmer is not allowed to continue? So a dq due to shark, maybe dnf due to shark? I wonder how many swimmers dq'd/dnf'd due to shark presence in the history of that swim.
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    @StuartMcDougal What I say is that the swimmer must do what the pilot says.
    The pilot has the final say in matters of security.
    If he says get out of the water because it's not save to continue for whatever reasons than the swimmer must oblige.
    That's counts for every swim in EC Channel, Cook Strait, Catalina Channel, Mims, etc.
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • Niek said:

    @StuartMcDougal What I say is that the swimmer must do what the pilot says.
    The pilot has the final say in matters of security.
    If he says get out of the water because it's not save to continue for whatever reasons than the swimmer must oblige.
    That's counts for every swim in EC Channel, Cook Strait, Catalina Channel, Mims, etc.

    Got it thanks Niek. Do you know if there's a time in the Cook swim (after swimmer has exited water for safety) the pilot/observer may decide it's safe to reenter (i.e. no sharks in sight) and continue the swim; or is the swim over, swimmer dq'd/dnf'd once the swimmer boards the vessel?

  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    @StuartMcDougal You'll have to ask Phil Rush from Cook Strait Swim http://www.cookstraitswim.org.nz/contacts.htm
    And I don't find numbers on the site for interrupted swims http://www.cookstraitswim.org.nz/history.htm
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
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